/ ©: WWF-Canon / Roger Leguen
The South Pacific is home to 6 of the 7 species of marine turtles, and 58 species of cetaceans.
WWF South Pacific's Marine Species programme primarily works to conserve two flagship marine species – turtles and whales – both of which play a prominent role in the culture of the Pacific Islands. Additionally, we are initiating work on other exploited species including the bumphead parrotfish, humphead wrasse and sharks - commonly fished for their high commercial value in international markets.

One of the challenges associated with protecting these species is that many of the animals that we work with exhibit annual migrations that see them cross political boundaries and ocean basins. As such, these animals are exposed to a wide spectrum of threats from being harvested for their meat, eggs, teeth, skin, shell and oil to becoming accidental bycatch. Further compounding the issue is the threat of climate change and its impacts on these animals' feeding, breeding, and migratory habitats and behaviours.

Our objectives are to work with identified partners including local communities, governments, academic institutions, other NGOs / IGOs, donors and the media to address key threats that will begin to reverse the declining trends of these species populations.
 / ©: Cat Holloway / WWF-Canon
Hawksbill turtles live on coral reefs where their favourite food, sponges, are most plentiful.
© Cat Holloway / WWF-Canon
 / ©: Cat Holloway / WWF-Canon
Humpback whales migrate from Antarctica to Tonga every winter to mate and give birth.
© Cat Holloway / WWF-Canon